1. I gasped like I was looking at a majestic waterfall

    (Source: prismspalette)

  2. gonna rewatch this show now. If I were to make a show, it would probably (try to) look like this.

    (Source: bogginsofbagend)

  3. 1123581321345589144:

A wealthy group of young people relax by a pool in California, 1940.
Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

It’s so beautiful. It looks like artist interpretations of dinosaur habitats.

    1123581321345589144:

    A wealthy group of young people relax by a pool in California, 1940.

    Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

    It’s so beautiful. It looks like artist interpretations of dinosaur habitats.

    (Source: natgeofound)

  4. flexibilitas-cerea:

    this.

  5. pewpuupalace:

    fearless-onisuika:

    carry-on-my-otp:

    If Stuntmen from the old movies don’t have your full respect then I just don’t know what to say to you

    Yo this so much. At the advent of cinema these people were literally willing to die for their art. It’s crazy, and awesome.

    Also if you find this awesome, people go check out a 2006 movie called The Fall, about a 1920’s stuntman’s stay in hospital after a stunt gone wrong.

    man things were wacky before color was invented

    Are those not all Buster Keaton? I think they are.

  6. aidosaur:

Merchant Goblin. pencil, photoshop.
Goblin Week!  It’s Goblin Week 2014!  This fella’s the spiritual successor to my Rooster Goblin from last year.  I really like drawing weird pack animals! 
Goblin Week has one more day!  Draw some goblins!

Yuko’s amazing! :D

    aidosaur:

    Merchant Goblin. pencil, photoshop.

    Goblin Week!  It’s Goblin Week 2014!  This fella’s the spiritual successor to my Rooster Goblin from last year.  I really like drawing weird pack animals! 

    Goblin Week has one more day!  Draw some goblins!

    Yuko’s amazing! :D

  7. Young-adult author John Green has done an amazing job mobilizing a generation of readers and writers through his “nerdfighter” campaign. Kids from all around the country shout from the rooftops that they love to read and learn and make art. One day Mr. Green will undoubtedly win a MacArthur Fellowship, or something similar, for the groundbreaking online community he’s created (as well as for his fiction). But not every kid is able to own his or her creativity in this way. In many working-class neighborhoods, the “nerdfighter” label just isn’t gonna fly. Self preservation won’t allow for it. I’m sensitive to this because it’s the way I grew up, too.

    — 

    Matt de la Peña’s amazing story on NPR today. Have you read it yet? You really should.  (via leeandlow)

    Really worth reading the whole article.

    (via hedgepigsofthenorth)

    What the fuck is that quote, though? Nerdfighteria has almost nothing to do with John Green being an author. It’s not a campaign either. It’s a community that grew out by chance out of a successful video blog. 

    (via cutmeoffmidfunk)

    lol ok are we doing this? really? does it matter where nerd fighteria came from if that’s effectively what it is now? did you completely miss the point of the whole essay, which is that that kind of community is inaccessible to many people, for myriad reasons?

    (via catacabra)

    I got his point, it’s just that nerdfghteria doesn’t apply to what he’s talking about. The way he’s talking, he’s making it seem like it’s classist and it’s not. There really aren’t a lot of communities like nerdfighteria. There’s just the one, so it’s going to attract a specific audience. Most of what they do is make educational videos and raise money for charity.

    It’s good that this guy wants to make creativity through art and writing more palatable for young people who, because of the pressures they face, have to appear tough.

    He just really doesn’t have to misrepresent John Green or nerdfighters like they’ve failed America’s youth. I grew up working-class and never read an entire book when I was in school, but I am a nerdfighter. I’m learning more than I ever have in public school because of their videos. They’re working towards getting girls into STEM fields in unprecedented ways. A lot of nerdfighters (including me) don’t even like John Green’s books. It’s a youtube community and their videos are literally accessible to anyone with an internet connection. Beyond that is a whole other issue. 

  8. Young-adult author John Green has done an amazing job mobilizing a generation of readers and writers through his “nerdfighter” campaign. Kids from all around the country shout from the rooftops that they love to read and learn and make art. One day Mr. Green will undoubtedly win a MacArthur Fellowship, or something similar, for the groundbreaking online community he’s created (as well as for his fiction). But not every kid is able to own his or her creativity in this way. In many working-class neighborhoods, the “nerdfighter” label just isn’t gonna fly. Self preservation won’t allow for it. I’m sensitive to this because it’s the way I grew up, too.

    — 

    Matt de la Peña’s amazing story on NPR today. Have you read it yet? You really should.  (via leeandlow)

    Really worth reading the whole article.

    (via hedgepigsofthenorth)

    What the fuck is that quote, though? Nerdfighteria has almost nothing to do with John Green being an author. It’s not a campaign either. It’s a community that grew out by chance out of a successful video blog. 

  9. venipede:

osteophagy:

endcetaceanexploitation:

Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language.
One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation:
"People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing "MY BABY DIED." Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed "CRY", touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences." [23]
Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age.

more about Washoe:
after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.”
the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him.
*information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson.

Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could.

    venipede:

    osteophagy:

    endcetaceanexploitation:

    Washoe was a chimp who was taught sign language.

    One of Washoe’s caretakers was pregnant and missed work for many weeks after she miscarried. Roger Fouts recounts the following situation:

    "People who should be there for her and aren’t are often given the cold shoulder—her way of informing them that she’s miffed at them. Washoe greeted Kat [the caretaker] in just this way when she finally returned to work with the chimps. Kat made her apologies to Washoe, then decided to tell her the truth, signing "MY BABY DIED." Washoe stared at her, then looked down. She finally peered into Kat’s eyes again and carefully signed "CRY", touching her cheek and drawing her finger down the path a tear would make on a human (Chimpanzees don’t shed tears). Kat later remarked that one sign told her more about Washoe and her mental capabilities than all her longer, grammatically perfect sentences." [23]

    Washoe herself lost two children; one baby died shortly after birth of a heart defect, the other baby, Sequoyah, died of a staph infection at two months of age.

    more about Washoe:

    after the death of her children, researchers were determined to have Washoe raise a baby and brought in a ten month chimpanzee named Loulis. one of the caretakers went to Washoe’s enclosure and signed “i have a baby for you.” Washoe became incredibly excited, yelling and swaying from side to side, signing “baby” over and over again. then she signed “my baby.”

    the caretaker came back with Loulis, and Washoe’s excitement disappeared entirely. she refused to pick Loulis up, instead signing “baby” apathetically; it was clear that the baby she thought she was getting was going to be Sequoyah. eventually Washoe did approach Loulis, and by the next day the two had bonded and from then on she was utterly devoted to him.

    *information shamelessly paraphrased from When Elephants Weep by Jeffrey Masson.

    Even more interestingly, after Washoe and Loulis bonded, she started teaching him American Sign Language the same way that human parents teach their children language. It only took Loulis eight days to learn his first sign from Washoe, and aside from the seven that his human handlers learned around him, he learned to speak in ASL just as fluently as Washoe and was able to communicate with humans in the same way she could.

  10. I’d choose you. In a hundred lifetimes, in a hundred worlds, in any version of reality, I’d find you and I’d choose you.

    — 

    (via recklessly-lost)

    WAIT WAIT WAIT… where’s my god particle script?

    (Source: dustofsleep)